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December 17, 2017

Library Collection

Articles & Research : Fund Your Business

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Library closed Dec. 24 and 25

All locations of The Seattle Public Library and the book drops at the Central Library will be closed on Christmas Eve, Sunday, Dec. 24 and Christmas Day, Monday, Dec. 25.

Fund your business

Library to Business - the Library can help you succeed

Small businesses and start-ups can raise capital from many sources:

Library resource - may require a Library card and PIN

Library resource - may require a Library card and PIN.

Selected
Web site

Available only in Library locations

 

Ask a business question
Free website - no Library card required

Commercial Lenders

Financial institutions, such as banks and credit unions, which make loans to businesses.

Free website - no Library card required

Crowdfunding

Small amounts of capital from a large number of individuals to start or grow a business.

Quick start guide: L2B: Crowdfunding

Free website - no Library card required

Friends and family

Create your network. Use social media tools, such as LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.
6 Tips for Borrowing Startup Funds from Friends or Family

Free website - no Library card required

Local, state and federal business grants

Government agencies do not generally fund small businesses with grants. Some specialized federal grants may be searched in grants.gov.

Free website - no Library card required

Community development corporations

Nonprofit organizations focused on revitalizing neighborhoods, typically low-income, underserved.

Free website - no Library card required

Microlending

Small loans to low-income groups or individuals who may not qualify for credit from traditional lenders.

Free website - no Library card required

Small Business Administration approved lenders

Small Business Administration (SBA) has a quick and easy tool to connect small business owners to approved SBA lenders.

Free website - no Library card required

Venture capital and Angel Investors

Investment funds providing seed money to early stage, high-growth, companies, often in the technology sector. Venture capital investments are generally made as cash in exchange for an equity interest such as shares or an active role in the invested company. Angel investors are individuals who provide venture capital for start-ups.

 

Quick Start Guide: L2B: Business Funding

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