• Ruth Ozeki and Karen Joy Fowler

    Join us for an intimate conversation with best-selling Hedgebrook authors Ruth Ozeki and Karen Joy Fowler.

    Enjoy scenes from Ruth Ozeki's new novel, "A Tale for the Time Being" and Karen Joy Fowler's new novel, "We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves," brought to life by local actors. After the readings, join us for a question and answer session facilitated by Hedgebrook's executive director, Amy Wheeler.

    Listen to Audio (mp3) [file size: 38.18MB] [Play time: 01 hr 23 min]

  • Khaled Hosseini

    Khaled Hosseini reads from 'And the Mountains Echoed'

    Khaled Hosseini tells a multi-generational family story about how people love, how they take care of one another, and how choices resonate through generations. 'And the Mountains Echoed' follows the characters' lives, choices and loves around the globe -- from Kabul to Paris to San Francisco to the Greek island of Tinos. 

    Listen to Audio (mp3) [file size: 30.89MB] [Play time: 01 hr 07 min]

  • Thrilling Tales

    Thrilling Tales: May 20, 2013

    In this session of Thrilling Tales, we hear two Victorian era tales, when the name of the game was Sherlock Holmes. The following tales are in response to the times: "The Stir Outside the Cafe Royal" by Clarence Rook, and "The Stolen Cigar Case" by Bret Harte. Recorded on May 20, 2013.

    Listen to Audio (mp3) [file size: 17.46MB] [Play time: 0 hr 38 min]

    Transcription (pdf)

  • The World’s Strongest Librarian

    Josh Hanagarne discusses his memoir 'The World’s Strongest Librarian'

    Josh Hanagarne discusses his book, "The World's Strongest Librarian: A Memoir of Tourette's, Faith, Strength, and the Power of Family," with Seattle writer and blogger Diane Mapes. -- While in high school, Hanagarne was diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome; he is now a 6'7" librarian at The Salt Lake City Public Library who competes in strongman contests. This debut memoir illuminates the mysteries of Tourette Syndrome, as well as the very different worlds of strongman training and modern libraries.

    Listen to Audio (mp3) [file size: 26.29MB] [Play time: 0 hr 57 min]

  • Gregory Martin

    2013 Seattle Reads 'Stories for Boys': Meet Author Gregory Martin

    The Washington Center for the Book at The Seattle Public Library invites everyone to take part in Seattle Reads "Stories for Boys," a project designed to deepen engagement in literature through reading and discussion. -- Martin's quirky, heart-wrenching memoir looks at family secrets, truth and reconciliation, acceptance and forgiveness. As Martin struggles to come to terms with revelations of his father's homosexuality following an attempted suicide, he relates humorous stories about parenting two young sons mixed with memories of his own happy childhood with the father he thought he knew.

    Listen to Audio (mp3) [file size: 30.18MB] [Play time: 01 hr 05 min]

    Transcription (pdf)

  • Stories for Boys

    2013 Seattle Reads, Book-It Repertory Theatre, and author Gregory Martin present staged readings from 'Stories for Boys'

    Book-It Repertory Theatre presents staged readings from "Stories for Boys," adapted and directed by Laura Ferri. Author Gregory Martin joins Ferri and cast for a post-performance discussion. -- Martin's quirky, heart-wrenching memoir looks at family secrets, truth and reconciliation, acceptance and forgiveness. As Martin struggles to come to terms with revelations of his father's homosexuality following an attempted suicide, he relates humorous stories about parenting two young sons mixed with memories of his own happy childhood with the father he thought he knew. Record on May 4, 2013.

    Listen to Audio (mp3) [file size: 35.50MB] [Play time: 0 hr 55 min]

    Transcription (pdf)

  • Kate DiCamillo

    Children's author, Kate DiCamillo discusses "Bink and Gollie, Best Friends Forever," the third and final book in her award-winning series.

    Hear the tale of Kate DiCamillo's journey to becoming an acclaimed children's author. She will answer questions about her books and writing style, and tell you what it's like when your books become movies. -- DiCamillo is an award-winning author of children's books, including "Because of Winn-Dixie," "The Tiger Rising," "The Tale of Despereaux" and "The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane." She has recently completed a series of early chapter books about a pig named Mercy Watson, including the Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Book "Mercy Watson Goes for a Ride." DiCamillo lives and writes in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

    Listen to Audio (mp3) [file size: 25.43MB] [Play time: 0 hr 55 min]

  • Isabel Allende

    Isabel Allende reads from 'Maya's Notebook'

    Isabel Allende tells a coming-of-age story about teenager Maya Vidal, abandoned as an infant, who turns to drugs, alcohol and petty crime when her beloved Popi dies. -- As Maya's grandmother Nidia sends her into protective custody on Chiloé, an island off Chile's southern coast, she hands her a notebook in which to record her story. Maya's diary relates a journey into self-destruction. Fair and tall, Maya does not resemble her Chilean side -- neither her absentee pilot father nor tough-love Berkeley activist grandmother -- but her Danish flight-attendant mother, who left her newborn with her in-laws. Maya's guiding light had been her grandmother's second husband, a wise and loving African-American astronomer.

    Listen to Audio (mp3) [file size: 23.08MB] [Play time: 0 hr 50 min]

  • Granta's 2013 Best Young British Novelists

    John Freeman in conversation with Granta's 2013 Best Young British Novelists

    Join Granta editor John Freeman for a reading and discussion with some of Britain's best writers, including a judge of the 2013 series and this year's newly announced novelists. -- In 1983, Granta devoted an issue to new fiction by 20 of the 'Best of Young British Novelists' and has released a new issue every 10 years since. From Martin Amis, Salman Rushdie and Kazuo Ishiguro to Zadie Smith, these lists offer a revealing snapshot of a generation of writers about to come into their own. -- Freeman is the editor of Granta magazine and author of two books, 'The Tyranny of E-mail' and 'How to Read A Novelist' (forthcoming). Freeman is also a poet and critic, whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, the Paris Review, Zyzzyva and The Believer, as well as a former president of the National Book Critics Circle. He currently teaches at Columbia University and City University of New York.

    Listen to Audio (mp3) [file size: 31.22MB] [Play time: 01 hr 08 min]

  • Elizabeth Strout

    Elizabeth Strout talks about her new book, 'The Burgess Boys.'

    Elizabeth Strout's first book since Pulitzer Prize-winning 'Olive Kitteridge' tells the story of the lifelong repercussions suffered by three siblings as a result of a freak accident that killed their father when they were children. In a conversation with Elliott Bay Book Co.'s Rick Simonson, Strout discusses the themes of race, immigration, and class that are woven into this new tale of family loss and the destructive power of secrets. -- Using a real-life case in Maine as a model for one of the character's legal troubles, along with Strout's own time as both a Maine and New York local and her expertise as a former lawyer, Strout brings deeply human protagonists into the present day and makes their story the crux of 'The Burgess Boys.'

    Listen to Audio (mp3) [file size: 20.58MB] [Play time: 0 hr 44 min]

Program Podcasts