• Man riding on Chilkoot Pass tramway, ca. 1899

    Man riding on Chilkoot Pass tramway, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    During the Klondike Gold Rush, several hoists and tramways were constructed to help prospectors transport heavy loads of supplies and cargo over the pass. Prior to the construction of the tramways, prospectors carried their supplies themselves or with packhorses. Peterson's Hoist was constructed in 1896 and relied on a pulley and sled system. In 1897, Archie Burns' Tramway, a horse-powered system, went into operation. In March 1898 the Dyea-Klondike Transportation company opened up their own tram, the first electric-powered version in the world. Later that year the company merged with the Alaska Railroad and Transportation Company and Chilkoot Railroad and Transport Company to expand tram operations. In June 1899, the tram was purchased by the White Pass and Yukon Route Railroad and the tram system was torn down, soon to be replaced by a narrow-gauge railroad.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00125

    Date: 1899?

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  • Two men in small boat on Yukon River, ca. 1899

    Two men in small boat on Yukon River, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    Exact location of the photograph is unknown. Camp equipment and supplies are set up on the waterfront near the boat.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00150

    Date: 1899?

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  • Prospectors on beach in Nome, Alaska, October 3, 1899

    Prospectors on beach in Nome, Alaska, October 3, 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    The men in the photo are employing a method known as "cradling." Prospectors would shovel gravel onto the top of a "cradle" or "rocker" box and rock it back and forth to sift through the gravel through to the lower levels and, if they were lucky, reveal gold. One of these boxes can be seen at the right of the photo. Gold was discovered in the area in the summer of 1898. Prospectors rushed to stake claims and Nome's population quickly ballooned to 10,000 people. In 1899, more gold was discovered on beaches near the town and spurred an even greater rush of visitors. By 1900, an estimated 1000 people a day were arriving in Nome. Pillsbury took some of the first available photographs of the city. Following his departure, the winter conditions made it too difficult for others to reach the area. The same photograph appeared in the June 1900 issue of Harper's Weekly. An illustration based on the photograph appeared in the June 1900 of McClure's Magazine.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00180

    Date: 1899-10-03

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  • Unidentified islands, ca. 1899

    Unidentified islands, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    Islands are presumed to be in Alaska but exact location is unknown.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00118

    Date: 1899?

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  • White Pass and Yukon Railroad at White Pass, ca. 1899

    White Pass and Yukon Railroad at White Pass, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence); Pillsbury and Cleveland

    During the Klondike Gold Rush, the White Pass was one of the routes used by prospectors to travel from Skagway to the Yukon gold fields. In April 1898 the White Pass and Yukon Railroad Company was formed in an effort to establish an easier way through the pass. Construction on the railroad began the following month. Thousands of workers worked around the clock in treacherous conditions to complete the project. The railroad track was completed at White Pass on February 20, 1899 and reached Lake Bennett on July 6, 1899. The final spike on the railroad was placed on July 29, 1900 in Carcross, B.C.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00040

    Date: 1899?

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  • Tagish Lake, Canada, ca. 1899

    Tagish Lake, Canada, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    Tagish Lake is located on the border of British Columbia and Yukon.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00159

    Date: 1899?

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  • Indigenous women in Nome, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Indigenous women in Nome, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    The same photograph was published on page 279 of the ""Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen's Magazine,"" Volume 29. An illustration based on the photograph appeared in the June 1900 issue of "McClure's Magazine." Gold was discovered near Nome in the summer of 1898. Prospectors rushed to stake claims and Nome's population quickly ballooned to 10,000 people. In 1899, more gold was discovered on beaches near the town and spurred an even greater rush of visitors. By 1900, an estimated 1000 people a day were arriving in Nome. Pillsbury took some of the first available photographs of the city. Following his departure, the winter conditions made it too difficult for others to reach the area.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00177

    Date: 1899?

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  • Group outside North American Transportation & Trading Company in Circle City, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Group outside North American Transportation & Trading Company in Circle City, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    The United States Marshal office appears on the left and the North American Transportation & Trading Company warehouse appears in the center of the photograph. A sign reading "Forest Fires! Warning!" is posted on the outside of the Marshal's building. A group including four men and one woman stands outside of the warehouse and a sign at the doorway advertises fresh potatoes for sale.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00185

    Date: 1899?

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  • Unknown man in Santa Barbara, California, ca. 1880

    Unknown man in Santa Barbara, California, ca. 1880

    Tuttle, W.N.

    Photograph taken by W.N. Tuttle in Santa Barbara, California.

    Identifier: spl_lj_030

    Date: 1880?

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  • Woman outside Long Lake Hotel in British Columbia, ca. 1899

    Woman outside Long Lake Hotel in British Columbia, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    Long Lake lay along the Chilkoot Trail, a Tlingit trade route between Skagway, Alaska and Lake Bennett (on the border of British Columbia and the Yukon Territory) that was used by many prospectors during the gold rush. The hotel was located at the south end of the lake. Signs on the side of the hotel advertise beds, lemonade and a bakery.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00086

    Date: 1899?

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