• View north across lower pool U.S. Science Bldg.

    View north across lower pool U.S. Science Bldg.

    Lenggenhager, Werner;

    United States Science Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “The lacy pattern of this six-unit complex placed around a central court with its 100-ft. high arches is in decided contrast to the forcefulness of Coliseum 21. In a sense, the pavilion is a salute to concrete, for it is believed to represent the largest single use of precast and prestressed structural components in the nation.” (An Architect’s Guidebook to the Seattle World’s Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 21)

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_01386

    Date: 1962-04-11

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  • World [i.e. World's] Fair fashion note: hats with tall feathers

    World [i.e. World's] Fair fashion note: hats with tall feathers

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Fairgoers, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair).

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00346

    Date: 1962-10

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  • View of 3rd Ave. No. from near John Str.; Armory upper right

    View of 3rd Ave. No. from near John Str.; Armory upper right

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00208

    Date: 1957-10

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  • Sunny last day; view So. On Blvd. East (3rd Ave. No.)

    Sunny last day; view So. On Blvd. East (3rd Ave. No.)

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Boulevards of the World at the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "The Boulevards of the World area is the shopping center of the fair. Stores, stands and kiosks displaying the goods and gifts of a dozen nations line the gay and colorful thoroughfares that tie the five theme Worlds of Century 21 together." (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 119.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00338

    Date: 1962-10-21

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  • View inside of Food Circus (Armory)

    View inside of Food Circus (Armory)

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    The Food Circus of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "Close to the center of the fairgrounds is the Food Circus, a great bustling eaters' delight. Ranged about the vast floor are 52 concessions, all producing food in its manifold phases." (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 137.) The building was constructed in 1938 as the Washington National Guard Armory (Architects: Floyd A. Naramore and Arrigo M. Young) and was transformed into the Food Circus for the Century 21 Exposition (Architects: Durham, Anderson, and Freed).

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_01108

    Date: 1962-06-03

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  • Korea House Restaurant on Blvd. of the World (2nd Av. No.) view N.E. To right partial view of Monans [i.e. Mohan's] Fashion Store of Hong Kong

    Korea House Restaurant on Blvd. of the World (2nd Av. No.) view N.E. To right partial view of Monans [i.e. Mohan's] Fashion Store of Hong Kong

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Korea House restaurant on Boulevards of the World of Century 21 Exposition (Seattle Worlds Fair). "Korean food and snacks priced under $3.00. No liquor. Bay 4, Building 3. Mrs. Won Sook Chung." (Official press book: Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, 1962, p. 49.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00421

    Date: 1962-04-21

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  • View S.E. across corner of playfield to 300 block 2nd Ave. No. & Field Armory

    View S.E. across corner of playfield to 300 block 2nd Ave. No. & Field Armory

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.<br><br>On the Mercer Playground: “The City first acquired property at what is now Seattle Center in 1900. For many years, this area had been known among the early settlers as ‘Potlatch Meadow’ due to the belief that Native American festivals had been held there. Ten years later, the City transferred the block-sized parcel, which is now site of the International Fountain, to the jurisdiction of the Parks Department, which developed it into Mercer Playground in 1910. Seattle pioneer Thomas Mercer had homesteaded in the vicinity. Mercer Playground served both the surrounding residential neighborhood of mostly working class families and the Warren Avenue School located across the street to the west since 1902.” (Cathy Wickwire, Survey Report: Comprehensive Inventory of City-Owned Historic Resources, Seattle, Washington, 2001, p. 18.)<br><br>On the Washington National Guard Armory: “In 1938, the Washington National Guard built a large field artillery armory on the block south of the Civic Ballfield. After eight years of lobbying and fundraising attempts for a new National Guard Armory building, final approval was given for a block-square facility, which would be built on land donated by the city. The new building would house the 146th Regiment of Field Artillery, the 66th Field Artillery Brigade, and the Washington Headquarters of the 41st Division of the National Guard. Other units would continue to use the Old Western Avenue Armory located north of the Pike Place Market. 55% of the funds for construction came from the state while the remaining 45% came from a Public Works Administration grant. The architects for the project, Floyd Naramore and Arrigo M. Young, had both established successful practices in Seattle. Their work on institutional and large scale projects provided them with the experience and expertise required to design a huge structure, such as the Armory, and successfully integrate it into the surrounding residential neighborhood.” (Wickwire, p. 18.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00281

    Date: 1957-10

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  • Sermon in [i.e. Sermons From] Science Bldg. to right; S.E. corner Warren & Thomas Str.

    Sermon in [i.e. Sermons From] Science Bldg. to right; S.E. corner Warren & Thomas Str.

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Sermons from Science Building, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “True brick panels, without any backing and weighing up to a ton, were attached to steel H-Columns to provide the finish interior and exterior walls of the Sermons from Science Building (architects: Johnson, Nesland & Sibold; general contractor: Gwinn Construction Co.). The panels, up to 5x9 ft. each, are made of Inca ceramic brick with holes for the placement of reinforcing steel. Exterior sides for one portion of the structure were glazed and fired in a cobalt-blue finish. The bricks were laid at the manufacturer's Newcastle plant and installed by the brickmasons on the building site, where the 2,000-lb. panels were lifted by a special suction cup device.—Builders Brick Co., 3900 Ninth S., Seattle. (No. 3)” (An Architect’s Guidebook to the Seattle World’s Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 46)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00260

    Date: 1962-02-13

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  • Exhibit at United Nations Pavilion; Int. Mall; View N.W.

    Exhibit at United Nations Pavilion; Int. Mall; View N.W.

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    United Nations Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “A lounge, film center and display of the work of the United Nations constitutes the U.N. exhibit. The pavilion is a meeting place for visitors to talk to officials and persons from the United Nations’ member countries. The American Association for the United Nations sponsors the pavilion. Miss Lee Minto, Director.” (Official press book: Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, 1962, p. 38.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_01029

    Date: 1962-06

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  • View West with China Pavilion to left

    View West with China Pavilion to left

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    View from Boulevard West toward Republic of China Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). “Surrounding the Coliseum is 94,200 sq. ft. of exhibit space in clear span structures of concrete columns and tilt-up walls with a steel joist roof system and metal decking and insulation. The concrete, laid out in a repetitive form which has become the architect's trademark, relieves what might otherwise have become a monotonous perimeter facade.” (An Architect’s Guidebook to the Seattle World’s Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 19)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00165

    Date: 1962-05-13

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