• View S.E. of Rand McNally & Co. to right so. of Coliseum

    View S.E. of Rand McNally & Co. to right so. of Coliseum

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Rand McNally Company exhibit, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “Focal point of attention in this exhibit is the Geo-Physical Globe, reportedly the most accurate and detailed scientific relief globe ever constructed. A display of maps and atlases includes the official Rand McNally map of the Fairgrounds. Less than 20 Geo-Physical Globes are known to be in existence.” (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, p. 42.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00812

    Date: 1962-05-13

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  • Space Needle from south of Coliseum

    Space Needle from south of Coliseum

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Space Needle, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “The Space Needle, a modernistic totem of the Seattle World’s Fair, was conceived by Eddie Carlson as a doodle in 1959 and given form by architects John Graham Jr., Victor Steinbrueck, and John Ridley. When King County declined to fund the project, five private investors, Bagley Wright, Ned Skinner, Norton Clapp, John Graham Jr., and Howard S. Wright, took over and built the 605-foot tower in less than a year.” (Walt Crowley, “Space Needle (Seattle).” HistoryLink.org, http://historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=1424)

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_01774

    Date: 1962-02-25

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  • Foreign visitor

    Foreign visitor

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Fairgoers in front of Plywood Home of Living Light, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "The unique Home of Living Light for Tomorrow, The Douglas Fir Plywood Association Exhibit which dramatizes the many possibilities of a completely new approach to home construction, is located on Freedom Way, at the north end of the Boulevards of the World. The Practical Builder, a trade publication, cooperated in the design of the house, which was created by the Tacoma architectural firm of Liddle and Jones. The walls are made of continuous wood paneling which, like corrugated packing paper, is rigid in one direction and flexible in the other. The results are walls that can take shape and still support the required roof loads." (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 47.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00345

    Date: 1962-05-30

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  • 1st Ave. No. 400 block; View north-east

    1st Ave. No. 400 block; View north-east

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00207

    Date: 1957-10

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  • Interiors pavilion

    Interiors pavilion

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Northwest Designer Craftsmen exhibit within the Interiors Pavilion of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "Reflecting new design trends in home furnishings materials, this pavilion includes 32 display booths co-sponsored by the American Institute of Interior Designers and its Resource Council." (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, p. 44.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00392

    Date: 1962-10

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  • Westside of Warren Ave. 300 block; View is towards Harrison Str.

    Westside of Warren Ave. 300 block; View is towards Harrison Str.

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00253

    Date: 1957-10

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  • Fashion Pavilion: Medal of Honor exhibit

    Fashion Pavilion: Medal of Honor exhibit

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Fashion Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle Worlds Fair). "This pavilion -- through (1) a fashion show area and (2) an exhibit area -- tries to show why Americans are often called the best dressed people in the world. The fashion show, as well as the 4,600-gallon Revlon, Inc. fountain of perfume, changes each month with the advancing season. Vogue Magazine sponsors the show." (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, p. 45.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00402

    Date: 1962-09

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  • 100 block alley. South end westside between Nob Hill & 3rd Ave. No.

    100 block alley. South end westside between Nob Hill & 3rd Ave. No.

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00262

    Date: 1957-10

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  • Space Needle & House of Light [i.e. Plywood Home of Living Light]; View S.E.

    Space Needle & House of Light [i.e. Plywood Home of Living Light]; View S.E.

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Space Needle and Plywood Home of Living Light exhibit, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). On the Space Needle: “The Space Needle, a modernistic totem of the Seattle World’s Fair, was conceived by Eddie Carlson as a doodle in 1959 and given form by architects John Graham Jr., Victor Steinbrueck, and John Ridley. When King County declined to fund the project, five private investors, Bagley Wright, Ned Skinner, Norton Clapp, John Graham Jr., and Howard S. Wright, took over and built the 605-foot tower in less than a year.” (Walt Crowley, “Space Needle (Seattle).” HistoryLink.org, http://historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=1424) On the Plywood Home of Living Light: "The unique Home of Living Light for Tomorrow, The Douglas Fir Plywood Association Exhibit which dramatizes the many possibilities of a completely new approach to home construction, is located on Freedom Way, at the north end of the Boulevards of the World. The Practical Builder, a trade publication, cooperated in the design of the house, which was created by the Tacoma architectural firm of Liddle and Jones. The walls are made of continuous wood paneling which, like corrugated packing paper, is rigid in one direction and flexible in the other. The results are walls that can take shape and still support the required roof loads." (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 47.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00594

    Date: 1962-04-28

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  • Coliseum under construction; Architect: Paul Thiry; View north

    Coliseum under construction; Architect: Paul Thiry; View north

    Lenggenhager, Werner;

    Washington State Coliseum, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “Superlatives are helpful in describing the fair’s $4 million theme building, for it is one of the largest clear span structures in the world; and the aluminum roof, the only one of its kind in existence, sweeps 110 ft. into the air at the apex, supported by steel compression trusses rising from massive concrete abutments.” (An Architect’s Guidebook to the Seattle World’s Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 17.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00468

    Date: 1961-03

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