• Hawaii Pavilion at night; View S.E.

    Hawaii Pavilion at night; View S.E.

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Islands of Hawaii Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "All-wood structure is 12-sided 'circle' 100 ft. in diameter with post-free 600-seat theater for Polynesian entertainment." (An Architect’s Guidebook to the Seattle World’s Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 39)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00579

    Date: 1962-08

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  • Coliseum as seen from Domestic Commerce & Industry Bldg. View N.W.

    Coliseum as seen from Domestic Commerce & Industry Bldg. View N.W.

    Lenggenhager, Werner;

    View of Washington State Coliseum from Hall of Industry, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). On the Coliseum, designed by Paul Thiry: “Superlatives are helpful in describing the fair’s $4 million theme building, for it is one of the largest clear span structures in the world; and the aluminum roof, the only one of its kind in existence, sweeps 110 ft. into the air at the apex, supported by steel compression trusses rising from massive concrete abutments.” (An Architect’s Guidebook to the Seattle World’s Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 17.) On the Hall of Industry, designed by Robert B. Price: “The domestic exhibitors in this building all show how the ‘magic key’ of research has just begun to open the way to the future. The pavilion is 277 feet long and is highlighted by six-foot multi-colored plastic pyramids that extend on both sides of the roof and ceiling.” (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, p. 43.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00443

    Date: 1962-02-28

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  • Interior [i.e. Interiors] Pavilion; stone panel by Jean Johanson

    Interior [i.e. Interiors] Pavilion; stone panel by Jean Johanson

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Stone panel in Interiors Pavilion of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). Jean Louise Johanson (1911-2000) was a Bellevue, Washington sculptor and mosaic artist, and was married to the architect Perry Johanson of the Northwest firm Naramore, Bain, Brady & Johanson. Her works include Seattle Children's Hospital's "Bambino" calendar image, the bronze fountain at Seattle's Westlake Center, and the pebble wall at Pacific Science Center. (Carole Beers, Seattle Times, March 5, 2000.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00391

    Date: 1962-09

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  • Warren Ave. Public School; View is from Harrison & 2nd Ave. No.

    Warren Ave. Public School; View is from Harrison & 2nd Ave. No.

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.<br><br>The Warren Avenue School opened on February 16, 1903, and operated until 1959, when it was sold to the State of Washington. It was demolished on August 27, 1959. During the Century 21 Exposition, the former school site was the site of the Washington State Coliseum, later known as the Key Arena. (Nile Thompson and Carolyn Marr, Building for Learning, Seattle Public School Histories, 1862-2000. Seattle: Seattle Public Schools, 2002.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00252

    Date: 1957-10

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  • View east of plaza south of Coliseum with Space Needle

    View east of plaza south of Coliseum with Space Needle

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Little Hippo Inn / Hippo Burger Restaurant, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "Snacks and meals are available almost anywhere you go on the fairgrounds. In addition to the food concessions to be found in the fabulous Food Circus...there are places to eat in every area." (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 135.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00438

    Date: 1962-07

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  • One of 2 lions at entrance to World's Fair Museum

    One of 2 lions at entrance to World's Fair Museum

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    The World’s Fair Museum operated on the grounds of the Seattle Center, in the former United Arab Republic Pavilion of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair), during the summer of 1963. It displayed photographs and artifacts from the fair.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_02007

    Date: 1963-08-16

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  • Sidewalk Art Studio

    Sidewalk Art Studio

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Sidewalk art studio at the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair).

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00081

    Date: 1962-06

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  • View east from Monorail station; Space wheel; train

    View east from Monorail station; Space wheel; train

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    Gayway, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "The Gayway is a $2 million operation designed by two experts in the amusement business: J. W. Patty Conklin, a 50-year veteran who handles amusements for the Canadian National Exposition in Toronto, and Harry Batt, who operates the Lake Ponchartrain Amusement Park in New Orleans." (Official press book: Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, 1962, p. 62.) The Alweg Monorail was constructed for the Century 21 Exposition to carry passengers between downtown Seattle and the exposition grounds.

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00529

    Date: 1962-07

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  • Architect: J. Chiarrelli; Model of planned municipal auditorium conversion; View so. from Mercer To the right is new 800 seat auditorium

    Architect: J. Chiarrelli; Model of planned municipal auditorium conversion; View so. from Mercer To the right is new 800 seat auditorium

    Lenggenhager, Werner;

    Model of Mercer Arena, Opera House, Exhibition Hall, and Playhouse, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). “The brand-new Opera House (225 Mercer Street) [designed by Priteca and Chiarelli] had been constructed within the shell of Seattle's old Civic Auditorium -- which New York Times critic Harold C. Schonberg described as a ‘6,000 seat, flat-floored, unpleasant’ space that had ‘held just about everything but bullfights.’ Now the hall was the 3,100 seat pride of the town's arts establishment.” (Peter Blecha, “Century 21 Exposition (1962): Performing Arts at the Fair.” HistoryLink.org, http://historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=9371. The remaining buildings in this model were designed by Kirk, Wallace, McKinley & Associates.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00030

    Date: 1959-08

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  • European Community Pavilion; N.W. of Coliseum

    European Community Pavilion; N.W. of Coliseum

    Lenggenhager, Werner

    International Plaza and European Economic Community Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "Surrounding the Coliseum is 94,200 sq. ft. of exhibit space in clear span structures of concrete columns and tilt-up walls with a steel joist roof system and metal decking and insulation. The concrete, laid out in a repetitive form which has become the architect's trademark, relieves what might otherwise have become a monotonous perimeter facade." (An Architect's Guidebook to the Seattle Worlds Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 19)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00389

    Date: 1962-05-05

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