• View S.W. of International Mall from Phillipine [i.e. Philippines] Pavilion

    View S.W. of International Mall from Phillipine [i.e. Philippines] Pavilion

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    International Mall of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). “The largest and most diverse of the five great theme areas of the Seattle World’s Fair is the wide and wonderfully varied World of Commerce and Industry. It stretches to the opposite ends of the fair grounds and it is divided into two major divisions, domestic and foreign. The foreign exhibitors are governments, alliances and groups. They are housed in the buildings on the International Plaza and the International Mall.” (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 42.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00326

    Date: 1962-10-06

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  • Coliseum interior

    Coliseum interior

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Washington State Theme Exhibit, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “Rising in the center of the Coliseum, the ‘World of Tomorrow’ exhibit symbolizes the 21st century -- just beyond man’s reach yet within his range of vision. The theme of this structure of interlocking aluminum cubes, ‘The Threshold and the Threat,’ depicts the ambivalence of atomic power, to be employed either for the advancement or the annihilation of man and his planet. Visitors ascend to the overhead exhibit in a globe-shaped elevator, the ‘Bubbleator,’ for a 21-minute tour of the future, which includes a look at the city of tomorrow, the home of the future, and transportation, industry, food production, education, communications and recreation in the 21st century…The ‘World of Tomorrow’ exhibit was designed by the Donald Deskey Associates of New York and installed by the Radio Corporation of America. The State of Washington sponsored and financed the exhibit.” (Official press book: Seattle World's Fair 1

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_01095

    Date: 1962-10

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  • Fashion Pavilion: Medal of Honor exhibit

    Fashion Pavilion: Medal of Honor exhibit

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Fashion Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle Worlds Fair). "This pavilion -- through (1) a fashion show area and (2) an exhibit area -- tries to show why Americans are often called the best dressed people in the world. The fashion show, as well as the 4,600-gallon Revlon, Inc. fountain of perfume, changes each month with the advancing season. Vogue Magazine sponsors the show." (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, p. 45.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00404

    Date: 1962-09

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  • 2 houses in triangle boundet [i.e. bounded] by John Str. - Broad & 100 block of Nob Hill Ave. No.

    2 houses in triangle boundet [i.e. bounded] by John Str. - Broad & 100 block of Nob Hill Ave. No.

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00264

    Date: 1957-10

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  • Interiors pavilion

    Interiors pavilion

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Northwest Designer Craftsmen exhibit within the Interiors Pavilion of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "Reflecting new design trends in home furnishings materials, this pavilion includes 32 display booths co-sponsored by the American Institute of Interior Designers and its Resource Council." (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, p. 44.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00392

    Date: 1962-10

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  • Westside of Warren Ave. 300 block; View is towards Harrison Str.

    Westside of Warren Ave. 300 block; View is towards Harrison Str.

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00253

    Date: 1957-10

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  • View N.E. to entrance of opera house

    View N.E. to entrance of opera house

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Landscaping at entrance to Opera House, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). On the Opera House, designed by Schack, Young & Myers, and remodeled by Priteca & Chiarelli: “The brand-new Opera House (225 Mercer Street) had been constructed within the shell of Seattle's old Civic Auditorium -- which New York Times critic Harold C. Schonberg described as a ‘6,000 seat, flat-floored, unpleasant’ space that had ‘held just about everything but bullfights.’ Now the hall was the 3,100 seat pride of the town's arts establishment.” (Peter Blecha, “Century 21 Exposition (1962): Performing Arts at the Fair.” HistoryLink.org, http://historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=9371. On the World's Fair landscaping: “Landscape architects have praised the Seattle World's Fair, as it is unique among international expositions. For the first time, landscape design is permanent, remaining in the Seattle Center after the Fair…More than 15,000 flowering annuals give color and texture, beginning with daffodils and tulips, going through snapdragons, china asters, dahlias (the Fair flower, although there is also a Century 21 rose), begonias (5,000 donated by the Dutch government), and early and late chrysanthemums.” (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, p. 71.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00669

    Date: 1962-09-01

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  • View S.E. of Kobe Bell on last fair day

    View S.E. of Kobe Bell on last fair day

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Kobe-Seattle Friendship Bell, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). Seattle and Kobe, Japan, formed one of the first United States sister city relationships in 1957. In 1962, the city of Kobe gave this one-ton temple bell to Seattle to recognize the friendship between the United States and Japan. The bell was partially funded by donations from Kobe schoolchildren.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_01114

    Date: 1962-10-21

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  • Fair sign post

    Fair sign post

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Sign post on Boulevards of the World, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). Intersection of United Nations Lane (Harrison St.) and Boulevard East (3rd Ave. N). "The Boulevards of the World area is the shopping center of the fair. Stores, stands and kiosks displaying the goods and gifts of a dozen nations line the gay and colorful thoroughfares that tie the five theme Worlds of Century 21 together." (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 119.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00959

    Date: 1962-05-30

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  • View N.E. from British Pavilion

    View N.E. from British Pavilion

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    International Plaza, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). “Surrounding the Coliseum is 94,200 sq. ft. of exhibit space in clear span structures of concrete columns and tilt-up walls with a steel joist roof system and metal decking and insulation. The concrete, laid out in a repetitive form which has become the architect's trademark, relieves what might otherwise have become a monotonous perimeter facade.” (An Architect’s Guidebook to the Seattle World’s Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 19)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00951

    Date: 1962-07

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