• Loggers

    Loggers

    Handforth, Thomas, 1897-1948

    Identifier: spl_art_H192Lo

    Date: n.d.

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  • Broughton's party on the Columbia River

    Broughton's party on the Columbia River

    McAllister, Parker S. (1903-1970)

    Parker McAllister, born in 1903 in Massachusetts, was a Seattle Times artist from 1924 to 1965. McAllister started his career as an illustrator at 14 for a Spokane publication; he joined the art staff at the Seattle Times in 1920. His first Sunday magazine cover was a poster-type illustration celebrating the University of Washington crew races in spring 1924. During McAllister's career, he created illustrations depicting “local color” events and situations now routinely handled by photographers. As the technology improved, he expanded his repertoire - he illustrated articles, drew covers for special sections and the weekly Seattle Sunday Times Magazine, and drew diagrams, comics, cartoons, and portraits for the Times’ editorial page. In 1956, an exhibition of his watercolor and oil paintings of Pacific Northwest scenes and historical incidents - including some paintings from the “Discovery of the Pacific Northwest” series - were exhibited at the Washington State Historical Society Museum in Tacoma. He was also a member of the Puget Sound Group of Men Painters. McAllister retired from the Seattle Times in 1965; he passed away in Arizona in 1970.

    Identifier: spl_art_291985_17.168

    Date: 1956

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  • Two riders

    Two riders

    Enabnit, Merlin, 1903-1979

    Identifier: spl_art_En11Tw

    Date: 1934

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  • Water seen from wooded hill

    Water seen from wooded hill

    Faliduff, W.

    Identifier: spl_art_F184Wa

    Date: 1931?

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  • Gray's Ship at Clallam Bay

    Gray's Ship at Clallam Bay

    McAllister, Parker S. (1903-1970)

    Parker McAllister, born in 1903 in Massachusetts, was a Seattle Times artist from 1924 to 1965. McAllister started his career as an illustrator at 14 for a Spokane publication; he joined the art staff at the Seattle Times in 1920. His first Sunday magazine cover was a poster-type illustration celebrating the University of Washington crew races in spring 1924. During McAllister's career, he created illustrations depicting “local color” events and situations now routinely handled by photographers. As the technology improved, he expanded his repertoire - he illustrated articles, drew covers for special sections and the weekly Seattle Sunday Times Magazine, and drew diagrams, comics, cartoons, and portraits for the Times’ editorial page. In 1956, an exhibition of his watercolor and oil paintings of Pacific Northwest scenes and historical incidents - including some paintings from the “Discovery of the Pacific Northwest” series - were exhibited at the Washington State Historical Society Museum in Tacoma. He was also a member of the Puget Sound Group of Men Painters. McAllister retired from the Seattle Times in 1965; he passed away in Arizona in 1970.

    Identifier: spl_art_291985_16.156

    Date: 1955

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  • The shower

    The shower

    Correll, Richard

    Identifier: spl_art_C818Sh

    Date: n.d.

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  • Douglas fir: one of the old guard, Lake Whatcom, Washington

    Douglas fir: one of the old guard, Lake Whatcom, Washington

    Colborne, Elizabeth, 1885-1948

    Elizabeth Aline Colborne was born in Chamberlain, South Dakota. She studied at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY and was a member of the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors and was also a highly accomplished printmaker. She lived in Bellingham, WA and maintained a studio in New York City. She worked on the Public Works of Art Project for the state of Washington in the 1930's.

    Identifier: spl_art_C671Do

    Date: 1934

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  • S.S. Queen returning Washington Volunteers to Seattle, ca. 1900

    S.S. Queen returning Washington Volunteers to Seattle, ca. 1900

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence); Pillsbury and Cleveland

    On November 6, 1899, the S.S. Queen carried back the First Washington Volunteer Infantry to Seattle. The men were returning from service in the Spanish American War. The arrival of the volunteers was described in detail in a November 7, 1899 Seattle Times article: "Grand beyond description was the naval parade with which the returning volunteers were welcomed to Seattle and to their native state this morning. The assembling and marshaling of the fleets, its progress down the sound, its deploying in columns as the Queen as sighted, the approach of the Queen with the volunteers on board, the gay decorations that made the rigging on the vessels a mass of patriotic colors, the enthusiastic crowds of Washington people who had come to Seattle from every part of the state to welcome the returning heroes, the progress of the fleet up the channel after the Queen had fallen into her place of honor, the salvos of artillery, the deafening din of soul-inspiring music, the shouts from thousands of people who felt that no shout was loud enough, no hand shake hearty enough to convey, and finally the return to the docks, all made up a scene such as Seattle has never before witnessed. It was a historic morning, and from the moment the first gray streaks of light broke in the East and the pulse of patriotism seemed to throb and vibrate through the air, and the contagion of enthusiasm ran from home to home from street to street, from land to sea. Long before 7 o'clock crowds of people could be seen hurrying along the street toward Schwabacher's dock where lay the fleet that was to steam down the Sound to meet the Queen and welcome the returning volunteers. To the great relief of the eager watchers who peered out from their windows to watch the first omens of the weather, there was not a trace of fog on the water, and even the [illegible] clouds that for a time hung threateningly in the dull gray light of the morning finally broke enough to admit streaks of sunshine and the weather god seemed to look down with special favor upon the preparations for a state's greeting and tribute tot he patriotic valor of her returning sons. The long reaches of Elliott Bay lay calm as a sheet of molten glass, and the soft subdued light of the morning lent a peculiar charm to the marine view. At the dock lay the Holyoke, Tyee, Tacoma, Wanderer, and Maggie, all gaily decorated to honor the occasion." The same article reports 5,000 people showed up at the docks, jostling with each other to welcome back family members and friends. Another article reported a crowd of nearly 200,000 gathered in the city to celebrate their return. This was more than twice the 1900 population of the city which numbered close to 80,000. The Pacific Coast Steamship Line Company's Pier B appears at the far right at the base of S. Main St.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00055

    Date: 1899-11-06

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  • Fish traps

    Fish traps

    Doughty, Nan

    Identifier: spl_art_D745Fi

    Date: 1945?

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  • Navarez in the strait

    Navarez in the strait

    McAllister, Parker S. (1903-1970)

    Parker McAllister, born in 1903 in Massachusetts, was a Seattle Times artist from 1924 to 1965. McAllister started his career as an illustrator at 14 for a Spokane publication; he joined the art staff at the Seattle Times in 1920. His first Sunday magazine cover was a poster-type illustration celebrating the University of Washington crew races in spring 1924. During McAllister's career, he created illustrations depicting “local color” events and situations now routinely handled by photographers. As the technology improved, he expanded his repertoire - he illustrated articles, drew covers for special sections and the weekly Seattle Sunday Times Magazine, and drew diagrams, comics, cartoons, and portraits for the Times’ editorial page. In 1956, an exhibition of his watercolor and oil paintings of Pacific Northwest scenes and historical incidents - including some paintings from the “Discovery of the Pacific Northwest” series - were exhibited at the Washington State Historical Society Museum in Tacoma. He was also a member of the Puget Sound Group of Men Painters. McAllister retired from the Seattle Times in 1965; he passed away in Arizona in 1970.

    Identifier: spl_art_291985_16.150

    Date: 1955

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