• Smith Tower at night, ca. 1928

    Smith Tower at night, ca. 1928

    Transcribed from postcard: "This great building with 600 offices with exterior trim of bronze and interior of steel, finished to resemble highly grained mahogany. Besides possessing every convenience required in the business day, has a Chinese Room adjoining and opening onto the observation balcony. This magnificent room is highly decorated in heavy and finely carved Chinese Teakwood, wrought by native workmen, embellished with myriads of porcelain panels in varying designs, replicas of those in ancient Chinese Temples. No room in America is more gorgeous, visited each day by thousands who are afforded a beautiful vista of Seattle, the bay and lakes and the snow capped mountain ranges, with Mount Rainier and Mount Baker in the distance."

    Identifier: spl_pc_00201

    Date: 1928?

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  • St. James Cathedral, ca. 1910

    St. James Cathedral, ca. 1910

    Bishop Edward O'Dea purchased the land for St. James Cathedral's First Hill site in 1903 after successfully petitioning the Pope to relocate the episcopal see from Vancouver, Washington to Seattle. The cornerstone for the building was laid in 1905 with more than 5,000 people in attendance and the cathedral officially opened on December 15, 1907.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00308

    Date: 1910?

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  • Alaska Building, ca. 1905

    Alaska Building, ca. 1905

    The Alaska Building, constructed between 1903 and 1904, was the first building in Seattle to be built with a steel frame. At 14 stories high, it was the tallest building in Seattle until the construction of the Hoge Building in 1911.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00226

    Date: 1905?

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  • King Street Station, ca. 1906

    King Street Station, ca. 1906

    Transcribed from postcard: "The Union Station accommodates more than sixty trains daily, running over rails of eight great railway systems. The tower is 240 feet high." During the early 1900's, there was an increasing press to connect railways with the city of Seattle. The high demand and competition between railways resulted in two railway stations being built directly next to each other at 4th Avenue and Jackson Street. King Street Station (which is depicted in this postcard) was constructed in 1906 and can be distinguished by its tower. Union Station, originally known as the Oregon and Washington Station, was not constructed until 1911. The postcard captioning can be confusing because both stations were sometimes referred to as "union stations" due to the fact that multiple railroad lines were shared within the same terminal. The back of the postcard provides the following description: "The Union Station accommodates more than sixty trains daily, running over the rails of eight great railway systems. The tower is 240 feet high." (Alternative names for Union Station include the Union Depot and the Northern Pacific Great Northern Depot.) For a good example of the differences between Union Station and King Street Station see spl_pc_01011 where Union Station appears in the foreground and King Street Station appears in the background.

    Identifier: spl_pc_01001

    Date: 1906?

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  • Central Building, ca. 1907

    Central Building, ca. 1907

    Designed by C.R. Aldrich, the Central Building was completed in 1907. At the time of construction, 3rd Ave. was being regraded to establish a more gentle slope and allow a retail core to take hold in the downtown area. The Central Building served several purposes, providing much needed office space for businesses.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00231

    Date: 1907?

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  • St. James Cathedral, ca. 1909

    St. James Cathedral, ca. 1909

    Bishop Edward O'Dea purchased the land for St. James Cathedral's First Hill site in 1903 after successfully petitioning the Pope to relocate the episcopal see from Vancouver, Washington to Seattle. The cornerstone for the building was laid in 1905 with more than 5,000 people in attendance and the cathedral officially opened on December 15, 1907.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00306

    Date: 1909?

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  • 4th Ave. and University St., ca. 1915

    4th Ave. and University St., ca. 1915

    Nowell, Frank H., 1864-1950

    The White-Henry-Stuart Building (constructed 1908-1915 and demolished in 1974) appears on the right and the Cobb Building (completed in 1910) appears on the left.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00203

    Date: 1915?

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  • Hotel Seattle at James St. and Yesler Way, March 1, 1907

    Hotel Seattle at James St. and Yesler Way, March 1, 1907

    Located in Pioneer Square at the intersection of Yesler Way, James Street and First Avenue, Hotel Seattle was constructed in 1890. It replaced the Occidental Hotel which burned down in the fire of 1889. In 1891, the building served as home to the Seattle Public Library. Around the time of the construction of the nearby Smith Tower in 1914, Hotel Seattle was converted from hotel use to an office building. By 1961, the building was abandoned and later torn down and replaced with a parking garage. This instigated a historic preservation movement in the Pioneer Square area to preserve other historic buildings before they could be demolished.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00820

    Date: 1907-03-01

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  • Smith Tower, Court House and City Hall, ca. 1950

    Smith Tower, Court House and City Hall, ca. 1950

    Transcribed from postcard: "Smith Tower, Court House and City Hall, Seattle, Washington, in down-town Seattle. From the observation platform in Smith Tower, a 42-story building, one may enjoy an excellent view of the city and surrounding country."

    Identifier: spl_pc_00210

    Date: 1950?

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  • King Street Station interior, ca. 1906

    King Street Station interior, ca. 1906

    During the early 1900's, there was increasing interest in connecting railroads with Seattle. The high demand and competition between railways resulted in two railway stations being built directly next to each other at 4th Avenue and Jackson Street. King Street Station (the interior of which is depicted in this postcard) was constructed in 1906 and can be distinguished by its tower. Union Station, originally known as the Oregon and Washington Station, was constructed in 1911. Confusingly, both stations were sometimes referred to as "union stations" or "union depots" due to the fact that multiple railroad lines were shared within the same terminal. For a good example of the differences between Union Station and King Street Station see spl_pc_01011 where Union Station appears in the foreground and King Street Station appears in the background.

    Identifier: spl_pc_01015

    Date: 1906

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