• Journey of Life, Seas of Life

    Journey of Life, Seas of Life

    Steve Leonard explores the oceans and discovers how the incredible variety of sea creatures arose. He traces the story of life's origins from the simplest microbe to the largest animal that ever lived - the blue whale. On the way he discovers how much our own evolution owes to the creatures of the living seas. Do you know which whales live in or visit the Puget Sound?

    Format: Streaming Video

    View Journey of Life, Seas of Life
  • Commonly Found Marine Mammals of the Puget Sound | Orca Network

    Commonly Found Marine Mammals of the Puget Sound | Orca Network

    A handy identification sheet of local marine mammals. The next time you're at the shoreline and see a seal or sea lion, notice its features and see if you can identify it using this sheet. What color is the animal? Does it have visible ear flaps? Does it walk on four flippers, or does it walk on the front two and drag the rear two?

    View Commonly Found Marine Mammals of the Puget Sound | Orca Network
  • Cetacean Fact Sheet | Seattle Aquarium

    Cetacean Fact Sheet | Seattle Aquarium

    Another handy fact sheet to help identify different whales, dolphins, and porpoise of the Puget Sound. Did you know that Orcas are members of the dolphin family?

    View Cetacean Fact Sheet | Seattle Aquarium
  • About Orcas | Center for Whale Research

    About Orcas | Center for Whale Research

    Did you know that orcas use different types of sound to navigate, hunt and communicate? Use this resource to hear these different sounds made by orcas, and learn how the orcas produce these sounds and hear the sounds produced by other orcas.

    View About Orcas | Center for Whale Research
  • Seattle Aquarium Live Cams | Seattle Aquarium

    Seattle Aquarium Live Cams | Seattle Aquarium

    Live streaming cams (9am - 6pm) of the harbor seals and sea otters at the Seattle Aquarium; includes links to animal fact sheets. Did you know that harbor seals can dive as far down as 1,500 feet below the surface of the water and can hold their breath up to 30 minutes? No wonder they can disappear so quickly and completely!

    View Seattle Aquarium Live Cams | Seattle Aquarium
  • Fascinating Fish of the Puget Sound and Salish Sea | Seattle Aquarium

    Fascinating Fish of the Puget Sound and Salish Sea | Seattle Aquarium

    Our local waters are home to some truly amazing fish—according to the Burke Museum, 253 species of fish have been recorded in the Salish Sea. How many species of fish can you name off the top of your head?

    View Fascinating Fish of the Puget Sound and Salish Sea | Seattle Aquarium
  • Chinook Salmon | National Wildlife Federation

    Chinook Salmon | National Wildlife Federation

    A physical description of Chinook salmon and a description of the life history, diet, range, and conservation of this animal. Did you know that the Chinook or King Salmon is the largest Pacific salmon? When the parks reopen take a trip to the fish ladder at the Chittenden Locks where you can watch salmon migrating up the ladder back to their home streams to breed. Can you identify the different species of salmon in the ladder? Use this handy website to help identify which of the seven species of salmon are migrating through the ladder. (https://spsseg.org/meet-the-7-species-of-pacific-salmon/)

    View Chinook Salmon | National Wildlife Federation
  • Octopus | Britnannica Library Young Adults

    Octopus | Britnannica Library Young Adults

    The Giant Pacific Octopus found here in the Puget Sound is the largest species of octopus in the world. Octopus are considered the most intelligent invertebrates (animals that don't have a spine). Did you know that octopus can open child-proof jars, use tools, and solve simple puzzles?

    View Octopus | Britnannica Library Young Adults
  • Song for A Whale

    Song for A Whale

    Kelly, Lynne

    Iris, a 12 year old girl who is born deaf to hearing parents, discovers a new passion after watching a documentary about Blue 55, a baleen whale (which we have here in the Puget Sound) who swims alone rather than in pods and sings at a frequency that renders his song unintelligible to other whales. She vows to use her talents to communicate with Blue 55 by creating a song that will "let him know he [isn't] alone."

    Format: eBook

    View Song for A Whale
  • Jellyfish of the Salish Sea | San Juan Safaris

    Jellyfish of the Salish Sea | San Juan Safaris

    Jellies are one of mother nature’s strangest wonders. They have no bones, brains, teeth, blood or fins — but don’t let their simple anatomy fool you. These animals are spectacularly diverse and beautiful and can be found gently pulsating throughout the world's oceans. Visit the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Moon Jelly Cam to see these beautiful jellies moving around in the current (https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/animals/live-cams/moon-jelly-cam). Take a trip to one of Seattle's many marine parks or downtown piers and look into the water -- can you spot a jelly? What kind of jellyfish is it? Use this blog post to help you identify the jellies that you see.

    View Jellyfish of the Salish Sea | San Juan Safaris