• Snowflake Bentley

    Snowflake Bentley

    Everyone knows that no two snowflakes are the same! Step back in time and explore the impressive mystery and beauty of snow crystals from "The Snowflake Man" himself, Wilson Bentley. A curious farmer living in Vermont during the late 1800s, Bentley spent his life observing, drawing and photographing individual snowflakes. This is a video version of the book written by Jacqueline Briggs Martin.

    Format: Streaming Video

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  • The Science of Snowflakes | Maruša Bradač for TED-Ed

    The Science of Snowflakes | Maruša Bradač for TED-Ed

    What are snowflakes? What’s the difference between snowflakes and ice? Drift along into incredible chemistry that allows for the beautiful and perfect structure of snowflakes.

    View The Science of Snowflakes | Maruša Bradač for TED-Ed
  • Snow | Britannica Library for Children

    Snow | Britannica Library for Children

    Learn a little more about the science behind snow: its formation, where it can be found, and more!

    View Snow | Britannica Library for Children
  • 3D Paper Snowflakes Activity | Becca Bliss Blog

    3D Paper Snowflakes Activity | Becca Bliss Blog

    Perhaps you've made cut paper snowflakes before, and you're looking for a way to step up your snowflake game! Look no further - here's a tutorial for making a 3D paper snowflake! As you make it, do you notice anything about the number of sheets of paper you use? What did you learn about the typical structure of a snowflake from the video above?

    View 3D Paper Snowflakes Activity | Becca Bliss Blog
  • The Water Cycle for Schools | U.S. Geological Survey

    The Water Cycle for Schools | U.S. Geological Survey

    Here’s an interactive diagram to explore the different aspects of the water cycle. Let’s see where snow fits in!

    View The Water Cycle for Schools | U.S. Geological Survey
  • What Is the Difference Between Ice and Snow | ThoughtCo.

    What Is the Difference Between Ice and Snow | ThoughtCo.

    Materials have three main states: gas, liquid, and solid. Snow and ice are solid forms of water: but what does that mean, and what is the difference between these two states of water?

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  • Why is Snow White? | Science Underground

    Why is Snow White? | Science Underground

    An object gets its color from how it absorbs light. Because snow is highly reflective, most snow reflects all of the colors of the light back to the observer’s eye. When all light is combined, it appears white.

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  • The Causes and Dangers of Yellow Snow | ThoughtCo.

    The Causes and Dangers of Yellow Snow | ThoughtCo.

    We've definitely heard the (hilarious) warning before: "Don't eat the yellow snow!" Did you know that this timeless winter joke has some truth to it: animal urine turns snow yellow, but pollution, minerals in the soil, and pollen can also be the culprit. The warning stills hold true, we might add, regardless of the cause of yellow snow! Just don't eat it!

    View The Causes and Dangers of Yellow Snow | ThoughtCo.
  • The Biggest Snowstorms! | SciShow Kids

    The Biggest Snowstorms! | SciShow Kids

    Blizzards are a special type of snow storm that occurs when cold air currents collide with hot air currents.

    View The Biggest Snowstorms! | SciShow Kids
  • 69 Years Ago Today: Seattle Experineces Its Coldest Temperature on Record | Seattle PI

    69 Years Ago Today: Seattle Experineces Its Coldest Temperature on Record | Seattle PI

    What’s the coldest weather you’ve ever experienced? This article (written in January 2019) reflects on the coldest winter in Seattle.

    View 69 Years Ago Today: Seattle Experineces Its Coldest Temperature on Record | Seattle PI