• Across Languages And Generations, One Family Is Reviving Cambodian Original Music | NPR

    Across Languages And Generations, One Family Is Reviving Cambodian Original Music | NPR

    Cambodia has a rich, vibrant history that goes back thousands of years and continues through its customs and people today. History sometimes shows, there can be important moments in time which change the course of a country’s history. For Cambodia, this most recently happened the 1970’s when the political party Khmer Rouge took control of the country, starting a war and the mass killing of Cambodian minorities (genocide). Through this radio story you can hear how one family was affected by this, and how their Cambodian heritage has played such an important role in their lives across generations. Reflect on the importance of cultural history in your life, does it shape you in any way? How might a war in your home country disrupt your current life? How might the decisions we make now have long lasting influences?

    View Across Languages And Generations, One Family Is Reviving Cambodian Original Music | NPR
  • Cambodia |CultureGrams

    Cambodia |CultureGrams

    To learn more about the events that shaped a place, it is good to know a little about the place itself, its daily life, history, culture, and customs. How does the life of an average Cambodian person compare to your life? What are the predominant religions, language, and cities? Who are the people considered important to Cambodian society and why? You'll need your library card number and PIN to access CultureGrams. If you don't have one, you can use your Seattle Public School ID Number as a Library Link (instructions at spl.org/librarylink).

    View Cambodia |CultureGrams
  • Visualising Angkor: Part 1 - Envisaging a Living City | Google Arts and Culture series

    Visualising Angkor: Part 1 - Envisaging a Living City | Google Arts and Culture series

    This website is designed by university students using 3D modeling software to show still images and videos of what life may have been like in the Khmer empire. They worked with their history department to make these models historically correct. Knowing this is a model of what life may have looked like from our understanding of the archaeological record, but that it is not in fact real videos of people 700 years ago, what do you think about this model as a way to understand a historical culture? Is this helpful to you? How does it compare to images you can see carved into temple walls? Can you think of some ways the computer artist may have unknowingly put their own ideas into this work?

    View Visualising Angkor: Part 1 - Envisaging a Living City | Google Arts and Culture series
  • In Cambodia, a City of Towering Temples in the Forest | National Geographic

    In Cambodia, a City of Towering Temples in the Forest | National Geographic

    Angkor Wat has been a part of Cambodia's history for hundreds of years. This was their empire's seat of power and their history has been carved into the stone buildings to last for all time. Today its iconic structures are a big part of Cambodia's history as well as its culture; the stone building of Angkor Wat is even on its national flag. Take a quick look at some of the buildings in this short video and how people have managed to live along side the past as they continue toward the future.

    View In Cambodia, a City of Towering Temples in the Forest | National Geographic
  • Street View Treks: Angkor Wat | Google Maps

    Street View Treks: Angkor Wat | Google Maps

    Angkor Wat was built in the late 9th century and lasted until the 15th century. Many of the structures still stand tall after hundreds of years. The stone reliefs are still on the walls of this ancient city. Now you can explore the well preserved stone structures of Angkor Wat through these interactive maps.

    View Street View Treks: Angkor Wat | Google Maps
  • The magic of Khmer classical dance | TedTalks

    The magic of Khmer classical dance | TedTalks

    Carved into the stone at Angkor Wat are images of Apsara dancers, illustrating the importance of dance in Cambodia going back over 1,000 years. Robam Kbach Boran, or Khmer Cambodian classical dance, was severely impacted by the Khmer Rouge genocide in the 1970s, but because of the efforts by a number of teachers, including the presenter here, Prumsodun Ok, Khmer dance lives on. As you watch this video, discover how movements and gestures reflect the natural environment and why the Cambodian people see Khmer dancers both as “living bridges between heaven and earth” but also messengers between past and present.

    View The magic of Khmer classical dance | TedTalks
  • Pebbles Vol. 6: Cambodia pt. 1 Original Artifacts from the Psychedelic Era | Freegal Music

    Pebbles Vol. 6: Cambodia pt. 1 Original Artifacts from the Psychedelic Era | Freegal Music

    All artists were targets during the Khmer Rouge genocide in the 1970s, particularly those who embraced modern ideas and ideas from western culture. Popular music in Cambodia during the 1950s through 1970s combined elements of traditional music with influences from Latin America, Europe, the United States, and other parts of Asia. Many of the artists you hear on this album did not survive the genocide, yet the music lived on through hidden recordings that were made into compilations such as this one.

    View Pebbles Vol. 6: Cambodia pt. 1 Original Artifacts from the Psychedelic Era | Freegal Music
  • Khmer Language | Mustgo.com

    Khmer Language | Mustgo.com

    Languages can be difficult to wrap our minds around, especially if its structures are outside what we are most familiar with. Spend some time on this website exploring the Cambodian language of Khmer (pronounced Koo-MAI) to learn a little about its intricate history, sound system, grammar, and more! You’ll also have the opportunity to navigate to other interactive webpages to dig a little deeper. Did you know it’s suggested that it takes 44 weeks, or 1,100 class hours, for native English speakers to achieve general proficiency in Khmer?!

    View Khmer Language | Mustgo.com
  • Caught Between Two Cultures | Opposing Viewpoints

    Caught Between Two Cultures | Opposing Viewpoints

    This story is from a book called "Voices from the Streets: Young Former Gang Members Tell Their Stories" published in 1996, available through the Opposing Viewpoints website and database. You’ll need your SPL library card number to access it. It’s a first person account from a young man who was seven years old when Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge came to power in Cambodia. After spending several years in refugee camps he arrives in Boston, Massachusetts in 1984, when he’s 14. You’ll hear about the choices he makes as he tries to balance his family life with his new world in a Boston school. You’ll read about the increasing violence he’s involved in and his choice to create a different path for himself and graduate high school. Sometimes we are asked to respond to situations we didn't create. How do you think you would respond if you were in his place? If you were a witness to atrocities, but not physically harmed, how might that change you? Who is affected by war? What do you think his parents felt? Do you think his race was a factor in how people treated him when he arrived in the United States?" You'll need your library card number and PIN to access Opposing Viewpoints. If you don't have one, you can use your Seattle Public School ID Number as a Library Link (instructions at spl.org/librarylink).

    View Caught Between Two Cultures | Opposing Viewpoints
  • Sweatshop| Kanopy Streaming Video

    Sweatshop| Kanopy Streaming Video

    ‘Fast fashion’ is a global issue that takes advantage of garment workers in developing countries, Cambodia included. This business of quickly creating high-end fashion trends in general retail stores has encourage people to purchase of low-cost often cheaply made clothing at alarming speeds. Even though these choices may not affect our own communities, these actions do have consequences. This documentary points out that fast fashion purchases are causing unfair treatment and underpayment of many clothing workers, also called garmet workers. We learn that the average pay for a garment worker is Cambodia’s capital of Phnom Penh is $3 per day, an unlivable wage. We also learn how the three fashion bloggers who travel to Cambodia are awakened to this crisis, and how they come to find that they can be part of the solution. Can you make any conscious choices to be part of the solution as well?

    View Sweatshop| Kanopy Streaming Video