• Boats and girl near Snake River in Nome, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Boats and girl near Snake River in Nome, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    Several tents can be seen along the waterfront and the sternwheeler "Fortune Hunter" appears on the left side of the river. It was constructed by Marine Iron Works in Chicago and assembled in St. Michael, Alaska. The boat was owned by the Klondike Promotion Company and also went by the name "Helen Bruce." Gold was discovered in the area in the summer of 1898 prospectors rushed to stake claims and Nome's population quickly ballooned to 10,000 people. In 1899, more gold was discovered on beaches near the town and spurred an even greater rush of visitors. By 1900, an estimated 1000 people a day were arriving in Nome. Pillsbury took some of the first available photographs of the city. Following his departure, the winter conditions made it too difficult for others to reach the area. A cropped version of this photograph appeared in the June 1900 issue of Harper's Weekly.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00179

    Date: 1899?

    View this item
  • Men on the frozen shores of Atlin Lake at Atlin, British Columbia April 25, 1899

    Men on the frozen shores of Atlin Lake at Atlin, British Columbia April 25, 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence); Pillsbury and Cleveland

    A gold rush began at Atlin in August 1898 and lasted through 1900. Tents surround the shores of Lake Atlin where several men can be seen on the frozen lake. Larger wood buildings in the main part of town can be seen on the far side of the lake.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00052

    Date: 1899-04-25

    View this item
  • S.S. Queen returning Washington Volunteers to Seattle, ca. 1900

    S.S. Queen returning Washington Volunteers to Seattle, ca. 1900

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence); Pillsbury and Cleveland

    On November 6, 1899, the S.S. Queen carried back the First Washington Volunteer Infantry to Seattle. The men were returning from service in the Spanish American War. The arrival of the volunteers was described in detail in a November 7, 1899 Seattle Times article: "Grand beyond description was the naval parade with which the returning volunteers were welcomed to Seattle and to their native state this morning. The assembling and marshaling of the fleets, its progress down the sound, its deploying in columns as the Queen as sighted, the approach of the Queen with the volunteers on board, the gay decorations that made the rigging on the vessels a mass of patriotic colors, the enthusiastic crowds of Washington people who had come to Seattle from every part of the state to welcome the returning heroes, the progress of the fleet up the channel after the Queen had fallen into her place of honor, the salvos of artillery, the deafening din of soul-inspiring music, the shouts from thousands of people who felt that no shout was loud enough, no hand shake hearty enough to convey, and finally the return to the docks, all made up a scene such as Seattle has never before witnessed. It was a historic morning, and from the moment the first gray streaks of light broke in the East and the pulse of patriotism seemed to throb and vibrate through the air, and the contagion of enthusiasm ran from home to home from street to street, from land to sea. Long before 7 o'clock crowds of people could be seen hurrying along the street toward Schwabacher's dock where lay the fleet that was to steam down the Sound to meet the Queen and welcome the returning volunteers. To the great relief of the eager watchers who peered out from their windows to watch the first omens of the weather, there was not a trace of fog on the water, and even the [illegible] clouds that for a time hung threateningly in the dull gray light of the morning finally broke enough to admit streaks of sunshine and the weather god seemed to look down with special favor upon the preparations for a state's greeting and tribute tot he patriotic valor of her returning sons. The long reaches of Elliott Bay lay calm as a sheet of molten glass, and the soft subdued light of the morning lent a peculiar charm to the marine view. At the dock lay the Holyoke, Tyee, Tacoma, Wanderer, and Maggie, all gaily decorated to honor the occasion." The same article reports 5,000 people showed up at the docks, jostling with each other to welcome back family members and friends. Another article reported a crowd of nearly 200,000 gathered in the city to celebrate their return. This was more than twice the 1900 population of the city which numbered close to 80,000. The Pacific Coast Steamship Line Company's Pier B appears at the far right at the base of S. Main St.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00055

    Date: 1899-11-06

    View this item
  • Sea Serpent and Grizzly totem poles outside Chief Shake's house in Wrangell, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Sea Serpent and Grizzly totem poles outside Chief Shake's house in Wrangell, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    The pole on the left is the ""Sea Serpent"" pole and the pole on the right is the ""Bear up Mountain"" pole.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00075

    Date: 1899?

    View this item
  • Boat at Calico Bluff, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Boat at Calico Bluff, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    Calico Bluff is located on the Yukon River near Eagle, Alaska.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00187

    Date: 1899?

    View this item
  • Five Finger Islands, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Five Finger Islands, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    The Five Finger Islands are located near Stephen's Passage, Alaska.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00114

    Date: 1899?

    View this item
  • White Pass and Yukon Railroad tunnel near White Pass City, Alaska, ca. 1899

    White Pass and Yukon Railroad tunnel near White Pass City, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence); Pillsbury and Cleveland

    During the Klondike Gold Rush, the White Pass was one of the routes used by prospectors to travel from Skagway to the Yukon gold fields. In April 1898 the White Pass and Yukon Railroad Company was formed in an effort to establish an easier way through the pass. Construction on the railroad began the following month. Thousands of workers worked around the clock in treacherous conditions to complete the project. The railroad track was completed at White Pass on February 20, 1899 and reached Lake Bennett on July 6, 1899. The final spike on the railroad was placed on July 29, 1900 in Carcross, B.C. White Pass City was a small community located near Heney Station which fell midway between Skagway, Alaska and Fraser, B.C.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00039

    Date: 1899?

    View this item
  • Boat in Taku Inlet between Wyndon and Taku Glaciers, ca. 1899

    Boat in Taku Inlet between Wyndon and Taku Glaciers, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence); Pillsbury and Cleveland

    The original Tlingit name for Foster Glacier was Taku Glacier. It was also known as Schulze Glacier in the 1880s and Foster Glacier in the 1890s before reverting to its first name. No mention of the Wyndon Glacier was found in historical or current resources.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00064

    Date: 1899?

    View this item
  • Boat on bank at Calico Bluff, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Boat on bank at Calico Bluff, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    Calico Bluff is located on the Yukon River near Eagle, Alaska.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00184

    Date: 1899?

    View this item
  • Bear family totem pole and buildings in Wrangell, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Bear family totem pole and buildings in Wrangell, Alaska, ca. 1899

    Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)

    A second totem pole, possibly the Raven totem pole appears to the right.

    Identifier: spl_ap_00076

    Date: 1899?

    View this item