• Washington State theme exhibit interior in Coliseum

    Washington State theme exhibit interior in Coliseum

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Washington State Theme Exhibit, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “Rising in the center of the Coliseum, the ‘World of Tomorrow’ exhibit symbolizes the 21st century -- just beyond man’s reach yet within his range of vision. The theme of this structure of interlocking aluminum cubes, ‘The Threshold and the Threat,’ depicts the ambivalence of atomic power, to be employed either for the advancement or the annihilation of man and his planet. Visitors ascend to the overhead exhibit in a globe-shaped elevator, the ‘Bubbleator,’ for a 21-minute tour of the future, which includes a look at the city of tomorrow, the home of the future, and transportation, industry, food production, education, communications and recreation in the 21st century…The ‘World of Tomorrow’ exhibit was designed by the Donald Deskey Associates of New York and installed by the Radio Corporation of America. The State of Washington sponsored and financed the exhibit.” (Official press book: Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, 1962, pp. 31-32.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_01100

    Date: 1962-10-07

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  • View south from exit of European Community Market Pavilion

    View south from exit of European Community Market Pavilion

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    View toward Washignton State Coliseum from European Economic Community Pavilion, after close of Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "Surrounding the Coliseum is 94,200 sq. ft. of exhibit space in clear span structures of concrete columns and tilt-up walls with a steel joist roof system and metal decking and insulation. The concrete, laid out in a repetitive form which has become the architect's trademark, relieves what might otherwise have become a monotonous perimeter facade." (An Architect's Guidebook to the Seattle Worlds Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 19)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00381

    Date: 1962-09-03

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  • 2 old houses N.E. corner of 600 block 3rd Av. N. & Roy Street

    2 old houses N.E. corner of 600 block 3rd Av. N. & Roy Street

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00242

    Date: 1957-10

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  • For the First Time in the United States : Paris Spectacular Wax Museum Presents An Ensemble of 26 Tableaux, Unique in Their Genre, Inspired by Art, History, Legend and Literature at Their Highest Didactic and Cultural Levels

    For the First Time in the United States : Paris Spectacular Wax Museum Presents An Ensemble of 26 Tableaux, Unique in Their Genre, Inspired by Art, History, Legend and Literature at Their Highest Didactic and Cultural Levels

    Poster advertising the Paris Spectacular Wax Museum, an exhibit on Show Street at the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair).

    Identifier: spl_c21_2808820

    Date: 1962

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  • Food Circus interior

    Food Circus interior

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Food Circus, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle Worlds Fair). "Close to the center of the fairgrounds is the Food Circus, a great bustling eaters' delight. Ranged about the vast floor are 52 concessions, all producing food in its manifold phases." (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 137.) The building was constructed in 1938 as the Washington National Guard Armory (Architects: Floyd A. Naramore and Arrigo M. Young) and was transformed into the Food Circus for the Century 21 Exposition (Architects: Durham, Anderson, and Freed).

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00427

    Date: 1962-10

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  • N.W. from Civic Auditorium; Mercer & Nob Hill Ave.

    N.W. from Civic Auditorium; Mercer & Nob Hill Ave.

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00288

    Date: 1957-10

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  • Decorative detail on Belgian Waffle House

    Decorative detail on Belgian Waffle House

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Belgian Waffle House (Gaufres de Bruxelles), Century 21 Exposition (Seattle Worlds Fair). "Belgian waffles are famous for being widely introduced at a worlds fair, and most reference books say that it was the 1964-1965 New York Worlds Fair. They are wrong. The tasty treats were a hit first in Seattle. The New York version was a lighter waffle and is better known today, but the Belgian Waffle House was a popular spot with the Seattle crowds." (Bill Cotter, Seattle's 1962 World's Fair. 2010: Arcadia Publishing, p. 101.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00445

    Date: 1962-10

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  • View N.W. in Show Street, N.E. corner of fairground

    View N.W. in Show Street, N.E. corner of fairground

    Voiland, Clarence E. (Clarence Eugene), 1911-2003;

    Paradise International, on Show Street, the "adult entertainment" section of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair)."With a thought that a sample of the best of everything belongs at a World's Fair, the northeast corner of the Fairgrounds is devoted to adult entertainment. This area is called Show Street U.S.A. Show Street offers food and drink, exciting show girls, the natural and the unusual. It's a great place to spend an evening…GRACIE HANSEN’S PARADISE INTERNATIONAL -- A lush dinner club featuring a Las Vegas type show put together by Barry Ashton. The entire operation is labeled ‘excellent’ by everyone who goes there.” (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, pp. 60-61.) <br><br>Clarence E. "Gene" Voiland was a West Seattle pharmacist who enjoyed using his new Balda Baldamatic I 35 mm camera.

    Identifier: spl_c21_jv_003

    Date: 1962

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  • Century 21 poster of Western Airlines

    Century 21 poster of Western Airlines

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Poster at Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair).

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00014

    Date: 1961-04

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  • View North to German beer cellar and Belgian Waffle House

    View North to German beer cellar and Belgian Waffle House

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Belgian Waffle House (Gaufres de Bruxelles) and Hofbrau Haus restaurant, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). On the Belgian Waffle House: "Belgian waffles are famous for being widely introduced at a worlds fair, and most reference books say that it was the 1964-1965 New York Worlds Fair. They are wrong. The tasty treats were a hit first in Seattle. The New York version was a lighter waffle and is better known today, but the Belgian Waffle House was a popular spot with the Seattle crowds." (Bill Cotter, Seattle's 1962 World's Fair. 2010: Arcadia Publishing, p. 101.) On the Hofbrau Haus restaurant, designed by John Graham and Co.: "Eight plywood bays are assembled in 20-ft. diameter vaults, one of largest thin shell spans in this configuration." (An Architect's Guidebook to the Seattle Worlds Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 40.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00462

    Date: 1962-06

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